Publication Table of Contents

Andrew Wm. Faulkner

 

 


Conference Proceedings


 

Oracle Development Tools User Group - Miami June 22-26, 2003

Marrying OSCM and Java development: the Prenuptial Agreement  (.pdf 83kb)

Andrew Faulkner

Oracle Software Configuration Management (OSCM) is a powerful offering of the developer suite with its origins in the management of Forms and Reports. Many development shops exist with a legacy of this work and some have taken the leap and irrevocably flipped the switch on their Designer Repositories and are now committed to SCM. There are a number of considerations as we start to manage all those artifacts that our Java development efforts are starting to spawn.

The technical and workplace issues around using the OSCM tools on Java projects are highlighted with best practices suggestions offered. The topics addressed include: JDeveloper integration, XMI transfer between IDEs, granularity, impact analysis, and integration with the heritage forms applications.
 

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Management of Intellectual Capital - 5th World Congress  -  Hamilton January 16-18, 2002

A Business Lens on Business Intelligence: Sustaining Intellectual Capital (.pdf 57Kb)

Alice MacGillivray & Andrew Faulkner

Many organizations are data rich and knowledge poor. In a case study, a collaborative
knowledge-sharing process, supported by business intelligence tools, helped British Columbia parks staff
set management priorities. This case study was driven by the need to effectively manage a rapidly
expanding system of parks and ecological reserves. The project captured, in a data warehouse
infrastructure, information shared by individuals about to retire, and management decisions made
collectively by diverse specialists. Computer-literate staff members can explore and analyze these and
dozens of related data sets in meaningful ways; others can easily access reports tailored to particular
management decisions. When used as a catalyst for open dialogue and enhanced tacit knowledge, these
tools have the potential to build bridges from mechanistic organizational structures of the past, to the
more systems-based approaches of the future.
 

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Oracle Development Tools User Group - San Diego June 24-28, 2001

A Business Lens on Business Intelligence - Twelve Tips for Success  (.pdf 41kb)

Andrew Faulkner & Alice MacGillivray

Many organizations are data rich and information poor. In a case study, Oracle business intelligence tools were used to help British Columbia Parks staff set management priorities, by transforming data into information tailored to particular decisions. Through this work and parallel research, a list of success factors for business intelligence projects has been compiled. Many factors including metacontent and a collaborative culture are important; business issues are more significant than technical ones. Because business intelligence tools encourage integrative thinking and shared decision making, their use raises issues about organizational “silos,” over-arching organizational goals or needs, collaboration, information sharing, and empowerment of front line staff. If used as a catalyst for open dialogue and enhanced understanding, BI tools have the potential to build bridges from mechanistic organizational structures of the past, to the more systems -based approaches of the future.
 

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  Oracle Open World 1999 - Los Angeles November 14-18, 1999

Metacontent Management with Oracle Designer & WebDB (.pdf 264kb)


The repository in Oracle Designer can be populated during the application development life cycle or through the reverse engineering of existing schemas such as those found in the data warehouse. A consistent problem is the lack of update applied to the metacontent elements of an application that in the repository of the maintenance phase.  Consequently the system model as represented by the entries in Oracle Designer becomes inaccurate and looses value over time.

Typically the organization provides Designer to its development and data administration team but the application manager, responsible for the operational system after delivery, has no access to the repository due to their traditional role, training and cost. Cost effective access can be provided to the application manager to the repository information using a simple web browser interface and Oracle WebDB.
 

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Oracle Developer Tools User Group - June 2-5, 1999

Deploying Business Intelligence in a Distributed Data Warehouse using Oracle Discoverer & Reports  (.pdf 173kb)

Through developing expertise with Oracle Discoverer and integrating it with Oracle Reports, the Ministry of Environment, Lands & Parks has leveraged available resources and their investment in the data warehouse infrastructure to deliver timely, appropriate, and previously inaccessible decision support information to the right user. Choosing a business intelligence tool for the user has dramatic cost and functionality implications.  Getting the right tool onto the right desktop unleashes the information in the data warehouse.
 

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GeoSolutions: Integrating Our World - Vancouver March 1-4, 1999

Managing Metacontent: Metadata + Meta-information in the BC MELP Data Warehouse

Cataloguing of the data holding is a key part of the Infrastructure for Distributed Spatial Data Access at the Ministry of Environment, Lands & Parks (MELP). Government users, the private sector, regulatory agencies, and academia expect that data be readily accessible. MELP has implemented the "Data Registry" which provides metacontent information to both its internal and external customers about available data resources. Internet and intranet users can search the data holdings using a simple web interface to locate the meta-information (who, where, description, purpose, currency) and drill down to metadata (instance, table, column, map theme). Functionality is focused on providing enough information for the user to determine: Is there data accessible that is relevant to my topic, and is it appropriate for my needs? Meta-information is available on a broad range of data sources.
Metadata management is concerned primarily with the holdings in the Ministry’s data warehouse. Current initiatives are in the evaluating of and compliance with emerging metadata standards such as TC211 and Z39.50 for describing and managing spatial data metacontent.

Oracle Open World 1998 - San Francisco November 8-12

 Making Your Data Come Alive with Oracle Discoverer 3.1 and the Web

Andrew Faulkner , Paper 233 Thursday November 12th 8am
(download the .PDF)

Add a spatial viewing context to your data warehouse with Oracle Discoverer Release 3.1 using its powerful HTML browser link to either in-house or publicly available mapping engines over the internet. Cross reference your identifying data to address and e-mail engines available on the internet. By including a few spatial reference tables in your database, data exploration using Discoverer can be made more interesting with the ability to pop up a map of the location that relates to the data being viewed and display more complete information the person, place, or organization . Code to link to several reference engines and tips on how to easily and cheaply add spatial information to your data set are presented.

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METADATA + META-INFORMATION = METACONTENT: UNITING THEORY AND PRACTICE USING ORACLE DESIGNER

Henry Kucera & Andrew Faulkner, Paper 242 Thursday November 12th 3:30-430p
(download the .PDF)
 

Large organizations in both the public and private sector are under pressure to catalogue and maintain their data holdings. The data products and delivery mechanisms provided by government agencies are lagging behind the needs and expectations of the private sector, regulatory agencies, and academia. The Ministry of Environment, Lands & Parks  (MELP) in British Columbia has implemented the "Data Registry" which provides metacontent information to both its internal and external customers about available data resources. The internet and intranet users can search the data holdings using a simple web interface to locate the metainformation (who, where, description, purpose, currency) and drill down to metadata (instance, table, column, map theme).  The functionality is focused around providing enough information for the user to determine:  Is there data relevant to my topic, and is the data available appropriate for my needs?  The metainformation is maintained by a custom Oracle Forms application used by data administrators. The metadata management is done with Designer/2000 and focused primarily on the holdings in the Ministry’s data warehouse. The coalescing of international standards and industrial strength tools  provides an avenue for data transparency and migration path away from  proprietary systems which are significant to barriers to valuable data. m

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Oracle Developer Tools User Group - Palm Springs June 2-5, 1998

Putting your data on the Map with Oracle Discoverer 3    (.zip MSWord 268Kb)

Andrew Faulkner, Paper 101 Thursday June 4th 8:30a

Until recently the focus of the maturing data warehouse has been on the fundamental construction issues of finding the data, establishing the data loading procedures,  and cleaning up the data. More emphasis is now shifting to the presentation on the user’s desktop. The availability of tools like Discoverer 3 places powerful control in the hands of the data administrator to provide a richer data exploration environment. Figure1 shows a model used at the Ministry of Environment, Lands, & Parks that highlights some of the drivers and outputs that are tied to the landscape.  One way to animate data is by using a map which is easily accomplished with Discoverer 3 by implementing an HTML browser link to either in-house or publicly available mapping engines over the internet.

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Technical Contributions

Oracle Magazine July 2000

e telligence Cover Feature Contents

In an age that's defined by information,
nothing is more important than having
comprehensive, up-to-the-minute business
intelligence and people who understand what
to do with it. As the world migrates online and
organizations preface everything they do—in
fact, everything they are—with the
ubiquitous "e," business intelligence not only
becomes more relevant but e-volves into an
entirely new aspect of business itself.

Data to the People By Philip J Gill

BC environmental ministry takes first
step to extend its Oracle data warehouse
to the public.
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Oracle Magazine July 1999

 

Five Intelligent Trends  By Philip J Gill

Five key technology trends dominate BI solutions: BI portals; executive dashboards; the
    Internet; extended operational and transactional systems; and the increased importance of
    prepackaged queries, or views, of enterprise data.

Empowering an Environment  By Philip J Gill

British Columbia's Ministry of Environment, Lands, and Parks has found that its
    business-intelligence efforts have paid off not only by integrating disparate information
    sources but also by fostering greater communication and cooperation across departments
    and branch locations.

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  Providing the Right Tools for the Job: Oracle's Integrated Business Intelligence Tools  (.pdf 45Kb)

June 1999

The BI supply chain defined in this paper requires a variety of BI tools because the needs of
BI producers and BI consumers vary along the chain. For example, the BI supply chain must
accommodate two levels of analytic users, whether advanced analysts (as with the Express
users at GTE Directories) or occasional analysts (as with the Discoverer users in British
Columbia’s Ministry of Environment, Lands, and Parks). Of course, the bulk of BI
consumers simply need reports distributed to them through a production system (as with the
Reports users at GTE and Ministry of Environment, Lands, and Parks).


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  Imagine this: analytical research in the hands of research analystsMay 1999, p.28

Dan Bolita of KMWorld Magazine

British Columbia covers an area of 94 million hectares (roughly three times the size of California), 90% of which is under state crown ownership. The provincial government’s caretaker of this land is the Ministry of Environment, Lands and Parks (www.env.gov.bc.ca). As part of its stewardship, the ministry is tasked with a surprising amount of data collection and analysis, ranging from counting permits for waste dumping and pesticide spraying to counting caribou and salmon.
 

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Other Publications

 

IT British Columbia: The voice of information technology professionals in BC

The Zachman Framework for Enterprise Architecture  March/April 1999


 

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